Wrapping the Meat for a Barbecue
At right is the picture of a rack of BBQ
ribs
, cut in half before the cook began, that
have been rubbed and then cooked in the
smoker naked for about 75 minutes.

The outside has firmed up and the color
darkened considerably during the time in
the smoke. The BBQ ribs are now ready to
be wrapped in foil for the 'Low and Slow'
phase of the cook.

You do not have to wrap your BBQ ribs, or
other barbecue meat, in foil. Many, maybe
even most people do not, in fact, wrap their
meat. But I do so and end up with fantastic
results, so I can honestly recommend the
technique.

The first hour and a half or so I make an
effort to create a lot of smoke to infuse the
meat with the flavor. This seems to help
compensate for a little less smoke
reaching the ribs after they are wrapped.

They will still get some smoke, and I add
wood to make sure.
When I wrap my ribs, the goal is to keep
the drip juices in the foil,
and have the ribs
cooking in those juices in the bottom of the
foil, for multiple hours.

The wrap does not need to be anywhere
near air tight, we like it just tight enough to
ensure that the condensation collects and
drops in the foil.

I turn the ends up to help prevent leakage.
Typically I will not turn the ribs at all during the "Low and Slow" cook period. I wrap the foil so
that the backside of the ribs - the side the membrane is removed from - facing down.

Since I am trying to contain the juices, be careful of the rib bones themselves that stick out
from the meat. During the first hour of the cook the meat will naturally shrink back from the
bones a bit as it cooks. This will expose the ends of the ribs. While I have never been
personally hurt by these pointy ends, they have ripped a hole in many a piece of aluminum foil
as I wrapped the ribs, causing me to use another piece of foil. But better to see it and start over
than have a hole in the foil that allows the juice to drain away. I do try and use heavy duty foil
whenever I can for exactly this reason.
Wrapped and Ready
A Butt roast (left) and a rack of baby back ribs (right) get ready to smoke in their juices!
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